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Housing and Shelter

    Results: 23

  • Adult Residential Care Homes (1)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Attendant Services for People With Disabilities (1)
    PH-0500

    Attendant Services for People With Disabilities

    PH-0500

    Programs that provide support for individuals with disabilities who need assistance with routine activities in or outside their homes.
  • Crisis Shelter (1)
    BH-1800.1500

    Crisis Shelter

    BH-1800.1500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay for people who are unable to return to their own homes due to sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking or other problems. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are in one of these situations.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (5)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for individuals, primarily women, who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women, where they are available.
  • Emergency Shelter (3)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (1)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Shelter (4)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Housing Authorities (1)
    BH-8300.3000

    Housing Authorities

    BH-8300.3000

    City, county, or state housing offices that provide information about eligibility for and vacancies in the subsidized housing properties that are under their jurisdiction. Housing authorities accept Section 8 applications, provide Section 8 vouchers, make approved Section 8 rental payments and administer public housing communities while in certain rural areas, the housing finance agency may play this role.
  • Housing Counseling (1)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Housing Expense Assistance (1)
    BH-3800

    Housing Expense Assistance

    BH-3800

    Programs that pay current housing bills or finance new living accommodations for people who are otherwise unable to provide for their housing needs. Housing expense assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing (2)
    BH-7000.4600

    Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600

    Housing programs that make rental housing more readily available to homeless people and/or low-income individuals and families (those below 50% of the area's median income). Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.
  • Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.6000

    Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.6000

    Residential facilities for older adults and/or people with disabilities who are unable to function in an independent living environment because they need assistance with toileting, bathing, dressing, medication management and administration, meals and housekeeping and other activities of daily living, but do not require nursing care on a regular basis. Living options range from state institutions for individuals with the most severe disabilities who require intensive services to settings that enable individuals with disabilities to live with their own families or in their own homes or apartments with supportive services from community-based supported living providers. Alternatives in between include health care facilities for people with a primary need for developmental services in combination with an intermittent need for skilled nursing care; community care facilities (residential care homes or group homes) for people who require varying levels of supervision and assistance in the activities of daily living; assisted living facilities; continuing care retirement communities; life care communities; foster family placements for adults who will benefit from interaction in a family environment; and semi-independent living facilities for individuals with disabilities who need minimal levels of support to live and work in the community. Some of these facilities are licensed by the state.
  • Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing (2)
    LJ-5000.6550

    Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing

    LJ-5000.6550

    Programs that provide a safe, secure living environment and supportive services (which may include educational opportunities, life skills training, financial planning, parenting education and counseling) for single mothers and their infants following birth. The objective of the program is to help residents become self-sufficient and move ahead with their lives by finishing school, acquiring job skills and learning to be good parents.
  • Recovery Homes/Halfway Houses (4)
    RX-8500.6500

    Recovery Homes/Halfway Houses

    RX-8500.6500

    Community-based, peer-group-oriented, residential facilities that provide food, shelter and recovery services in a supportive, non-drinking, drug-free environment for people who have completed a hospital or residential substance use disorder rehabilitation program and need continued support in a residential setting to sustain their recovery. Services may include case management, relapse prevention counseling, 12-step meetings, educational and vocational planning, recreational activities and assistance in obtaining health, social, vocational and other services available in the community. Residents are expected to abide by house rules which vary from facility to facility. The objective is to help people who are recovering from an alcohol and/or other drug use disorder bridge the gap between intensive treatment and independent sober living.
  • Rent Payment Assistance (2)
    BH-3800.7000

    Rent Payment Assistance

    BH-3800.7000

    Programs that make rental payments for people who are at risk of eviction without assistance. Also included are rent supplement programs that provide assistance with ongoing monthly rental costs. Rent payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Rental Deposit Assistance (1)
    BH-3800.7250

    Rental Deposit Assistance

    BH-3800.7250

    Programs that provide cash grants or loans for people who are in the process of acquiring rental housing and who can handle the monthly rental payments, but who do not have the assets to pay the first month's rent, in some cases, the last month's rent, and any security deposits required to move in.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (4)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers (1)
    BH-7000.4600-700

    Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers

    BH-7000.4600-700

    A federally-supported, tenant-based housing program administered by local housing authorities that provides assistance in the form of vouchers that enable income-eligible families to find and lease approved privately owned housing where the landlord has agreed to enter into a contract with the housing authority and/or finance agency. Tenant-based assistance provides rental subsidies that move with a household into any qualifying housing within a certain area. The housing can be (and often is) private housing that may not have been built with the intention of accepting solely low-income tenants, but if the quality and cost of the unit fall within a specified range, it may qualify. Eligible households pay approximately 30% to 40% of their adjusted gross income for rent and the housing authority subsidizes the balance.
  • Shared Housing Facilities (2)
    BH-7000.4600-750

    Shared Housing Facilities

    BH-7000.4600-750

    Apartments or other living spaces that are designed to be shared by two or more unrelated individuals each of whom pays a portion of the cost. Residents generally have their own private space such as a bedroom and share common areas.
  • Street Outreach Programs (1)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Supportive Housing (2)
    BH-8400

    Supportive Housing

    BH-8400

    Programs that provide an alternative living arrangement for individuals who, because of age, disability, substance abuse, mental illness, chronic homelessness or other circumstances, are unable to live independently without care, supervision and/or support to help them in the activities of daily living; or who need access to case management, housing support, vocational, employment and other services to transition to independent living.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (7)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Weatherization Programs (1)
    BH-3000.1800-950

    Weatherization Programs

    BH-3000.1800-950

    Programs that provide assistance in the form of labor and supplies to help people improve the energy efficiency of their homes and protect them from the elements. The program provides ceiling insulation, attic venting, double glazed windows, weather-stripping, minor housing envelope repairs, low-flow showerheads, evaporative cooler vent covers, water heater blankets, pipe wrap, duct wrap, switch and outlet gaskets, caulking, and other related energy conservation measures. Weatherization programs may have age, income, disability or other eligibility requirements.